Media Release: Call for Premier to back off new logging plan as another major forestry player points out the jeopardy to industry

In the light of a letter from Artec, a major woodchip exporter from native forests, suggesting that the plan to open 357,000 hectares of high conservation value forests to logging could jeopardise their international business, Markets For Change is calling on the Tasmanian government to withdraw its controversial plan.

“It seems that virtually all sides of the forestry argument except the Tasmanian government understand how irresponsible and counterproductive their new logging plan is. It would damage important environmental values at the same time as putting the entire industry at risk,” said Markets For Change CEO Peg Putt.

MEDIA RELEASE                                         

18th November, 2016

In the light of a letter from Artec, a major woodchip exporter from native forests, suggesting that the plan to open 357,000 hectares of high conservation value forests to logging could jeopardise their international business, Markets For Change is calling on the Tasmanian government to withdraw its controversial plan.

“It seems that virtually all sides of the forestry argument except the Tasmanian government understand how irresponsible and counterproductive their new logging plan is. It would damage important environmental values at the same time as putting the entire industry at risk,” said Markets For Change CEO Peg Putt.

“It’s time the Premier stepped in to withdraw this inept and confrontational plan that was never suggested by Forestry Tasmania, who provided entirely different advice.” 

“Companies operating in the three major segments of an integrated forest industry, being sawn timber, peeler logs, and woodchip, have now voiced serious concerns. That’s an epic fail.”

“The Tasmanian government seems stuck in a time warp where they simply haven’t understood the changes in international and domestic markets which are reacting to the worldwide loss of intact natural forests and the species that depend on them. The markets have backed away from an association with environmental damage and controversy, but that’s what the Resources Minister is determined to serve up to them.”

“The concern that government actions could jeopardise trade in Tasmanian forest products is spot on, and the message is coming from industry as well as environment interests.”

“Minister Barnett likes to blame the messenger about the new approach of customer companies and consumers as he slings off at Markets For Change again, but he needs to recognise that his anti-environmental approach and disparaging rhetoric are the problem set to sabotage the industry,” Ms Putt concluded.


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.